Tom Morello shares footage from one of his last shows with Chris Cornell

Publish Date
Tuesday, 15 February 2022, 6:52PM

Just months before Chris Cornell's death, Audioslave reunited to perform at Prophets of Rage's Anti-Inaugural Ball, but during their 10-year hiatus, Cornell and Morello got together in 2016 to play a benefit concert in Seattle to support raising minimum wage. The guitarist recently unearthed some "incredible lost footage" from that set, where he and Cornell covered Woody Guthrie's “This Land Is Your Land.” He also revealed it was the "second to last time" the two played together.

"Incredible lost footage of @chriscornellofficial & I blowing the roof off a small club in Seattle (the former Off Ramp, aka ‘grunge ground zero’) with a little Woody Guthrie “This Land Is Your Land” at a benefit show to raise the minimum wage in 2016," he captioned the video on Instagram. "Second to last time I played with my friend."

See Morello's post below.

Last Easter, Morello detailed why he wrote the song "Garden of Gethsemane" for Cornell.

"In between the Last Supper and his eventual arrest/trial/execution Jesus meditated among the olive trees in the Garden of Gethsemane in Jerusalem and had his 'moment of doubt'. He was greatly troubled and asked his apostles to stay awake with him. They all promptly fell asleep. Alone and contemplating his imminent torture and death he was in an emotional agony. According to the Gospel of Luke 'his sweat was as it were great drops of blood falling down to the ground.' He prayed that the 'cup be taken from his lips' but in the end accepted divine will and his fate. At the conclusion of the Gospel narrative, Jesus at peace, accepts that the hour has come for him to be betrayed."

"I was raised Catholic and was always fascinated by this story and contemplated how one rose of certainty can be shrouded in one hundred thorns of doubt," Morello continued. "With that in mind I wrote this song for my friend Chris Cornell."

This article was first published on iheart.com and is republished here with permission